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Information for Dogs

Parvovirus Enteritis

Authored By:  Kathryn R. Krueger, DVM


What is Parvovirus?  

Parvovirus is a highly contagious disease spread by the fecal material of affected animals. The virus infects the walls of the intestines, causing the interior lining of the intestines to slough.  It is a serious disease, and can be over 90% fatal if untreated.  It causes vomiting, diarrhea (which is often bloody), lethargy (depression), pain, and life threatening dehydration. 
 

2014 Seattle Met Top Vets

We have exciting news!  Dr. James C. Little has been selected in the 2013  and 2014  list of Top Veterinarians in Seattle Met magazine!  Ballots were sent to veterinarians in our four local counties, asking which veterinarians they would recommend to provide care to your loved ones and  Dr. James C. Little was chosen for his exceptional care and expertise in small animals and exotics.
 

Stop the Scratching!

Tips for having flea free pets

By: Janet Beagley, DVM

 Fleas are a common problem for our furry friends. You may have an itchy, miserable pet that has scratched all the hair of its rear end, little rice grain segments found in your pets poop (these may be tapeworms, which often result from you pet ingesting fleas), or simply little brown specs noted in your pets fur. Fleas are treatable and preventable, but they still present many challenges.  These challenges vary depending on your pet’s environment, how many animals live in your house, and whether wildlife or stay animals have access to your yard.

What is MDR??


Multidrug Sensitivity in Dogs *
Drug sensitivities result from a mutation in the multi-drug resistance gene (MDR1). This gene encodes a protein, P-glycoprotein that is responsible for pumping many drugs and other toxins out of the brain. Dogs with the mutant gene cannot pump some drugs out of the brain as a normal dog would, which may result in abnormal neurologic signs. The result may be an illness requiring an extended hospital stay - or even death.
 
Some dog breeds are more sensitive to certain drugs than other breeds. Collies and related breeds, for instance, can have adverse reactions to drugs such as ivermectin and loperamide (Imodium). At Washington State University's College of Veterinary Medicine you can get your dog tested for drug sensitivity and keep up with the latest research.
 

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